Flashcard Translation Thoughts

Figured this could be a catch-all for thoughts on alternative translations for the English version of the German sentences.

Er wird Himmel und Hölle in Bewegung setzen um Karten zu bekommen

The translation includes to set Heaven and Hell in motion

I do not know about other dialects of English, but in the US we say to move heaven and Hell rather than to set . . . in motion for this idiom.

I mean, they're the same thing and 100% I understand the current version. And since it's a German course, I don't think it's a problem. But I figured I'd put this thought here.

last edited by Kyle Goetz

@Kyle-Goetz Guten Morgen Kyle! Ja, ich stimme dir zu. Hab die Übersetzung geändert. :) Danke auch für die Erstellung dieses Threads - keep better translations coming for sure!

There is a card, Der Umsatz dieses Unternehmens ist um 50% gestiegen. The English translation is The turnover of this company has increased by 50% with the offered translations of Umsatz being turnover, sales, revenue.

Turnover and revenue are extremely different things. How do I know which one it is? To me, "turnover" means how often employees quit/are fired and are replaced with new employees, while "revenue" is the money a company makes without subtracting costs. The former is a bad thing, while the latter is a good thing.

Thanks!

last edited by Kyle Goetz

@Kyle-Goetz 1, 2, 3, 4 all the sources agree upon turnover, revenue and sales being the same thing as we speak about finances. Though "turnover" is also used in HR management, the context is totally clear in this case. Though I admit it's quite arrogant to argue with the native speaker, for some weird reason most of the time I see this word used as a financial term.

last edited by dev_temp

Thanks, @dev_temp . Believe it or not, despite having three university degrees (so somewhat educated) and being a higher up in a company (although I'm in legal, not accounting/sales), I have never encountered "turnover" used that way! But I 100% believe you. You learn something new every day. Although I'll likely steer clear of using the word this way out of lack of confidence :D

OK, with a bit more digging, a tend to conclude that using turnover as a financial term is more common for the UK and Americans usually use it as a management term. Some also use the term "employee turnover" to avoid confusion, I guess. I think it explains the situation we have here.

@dev_temp Yes, based on several decades in International Finance, confirming throughout Europe (and UK) the English term turnover means 'gross revenue' or 'sales'. Not the same as the HR term.

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